Unit #14 - The Modern World
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Unit #14 Daily Lessons (Subject to change)
Semester TEST
Monday, May 15
Tuesday, May 16
Wednesday, May 17
Thursday, May 18
Friday, May 19
Monday, May 20
Tuesday, May 23
Wednesday, May 24
Thursday, May 25
Friday, May 26
These days will be used
to review the information
and skills presented in
this semester and measure
the objectives learned.
**Note: Any assignments NOT completed in class will be considered HOMEWORK**
**Note: Any assignments NOT completed in class will be considered HOMEWORK**
Daily Activities
Day/Date
Assignments
Review for Semester TEST
Monday, May 29
Tuesday, May 30
Wednesday, May 31
Thursday, June 1
Friday, June 2
Unit #14 - The Modern World
Unit Objectives
Unit Objectives
WH.1  History. The student understands traditional historical points of reference in world history. The student is expected to:
      WH.1F  identify major causes and describe the major effects of the following important turning points in world history from 1914 to the present: the world wars and their
                    impact on political, economic, and social systems; communist revolutions and their impact on the Cold War; independence movements; and globalization.
WH.13  History. The student understands the impact of major events associated with the Cold War and independence movements. The student is expected to:
      WH.13D  explain the roles of modern world leaders, including Ronald Reagan, Mikhail Gorbachev, Lech Walesa, and Pope John Paul II, in the collapse of communism in
                       Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union;
      WH.13E  summarize the rise of independence movements in Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia and reasons for ongoing conflicts;
      WH.13F  explain how Arab rejection of the State of Israel has led to ongoing conflict.
WH.14  History. The student understands the development of radical Islamic fundamentalism and the subsequent use of terrorism by some of its adherents. The student is expected to:
      WH.14A  summarize the development and impact of radical Islamic fundamentalism on events in the second half of the 20th century, including Palestinian terrorism and the growth of al Qaeda;
      WH.14B  explain the U.S. response to terrorism from September 11, 2001, to the present.
WH.16  Geography. The student understands the impact of geographic factors on major historic events and processes. The student is expected to:
      WH.16A  locate places and regions of historical significance directly related to major eras and turning points in world history;
      WH.16B  analyze the influence of human and physical geographic factors on major events in world history, including the development of river valley civilizations, trade in the Indian Ocean,
                       and the opening of the Panama and Suez canals.
      WH.16C  interpret maps, charts, and graphs to explain how geography has influenced people and events in the past.
WH.17  Economics. The student understands the impact of the Neolithic and Industrial revolutions and globalization on humanity. The student is expected to:
      WH.17C  summarize the economic and social impact of 20th century globalization.
WH.18  Economics. The student understands the historical origins of contemporary economic systems and the benefits of free enterprise in world history. The student is expected to:
      WH.18E  explain why communist command economies collapsed in competition with free market economies at the end of the 20th century;
      WH.18F  formulate generalizations on how economic freedom improved the human condition, based on students' knowledge of the benefits of free enterprise and
                      20th-century free market economies, compared to communist command communities.
WH.21  Citizenship. The student understands the significance of political choices and decisions made by individuals, groups, and nations throughout history. The student is expected to:
      WH.21A  describe how people have participated in supporting or changing their governments;
      WH.21B  describe the rights and responsibilities of citizens and noncitizens in civic participation throughout history;
      WH.21C  identify examples of key persons who were successful in shifting political thought, including William Wilberforce.
WH.22  Citizenship. The student understands the historical development of significant legal and political concepts related to the rights and responsibilities of citizenship.
     The student is expected to:
      WH.22E  identify examples of individuals who led resistance to political oppression such as Nelson Mandela, Mohandas Gandhi, Oscar Romero, Natan Sharansky,
                      Las Madres de la Plaza de Mayo, and Chinese student protestors in Tiananmen Square;
      WH.22F  assess the degree to which American ideals have advanced human rights and democratic ideas throughout the world.
WH.23  Culture. The student understands the history and relevance of major religious and philosophical traditions. The student is expected to:
      WH.23B  identify examples of religious influence on various events referenced in the major eras of world history.
WH.24  Culture. The student understands the roles of women, children, and families in different historical cultures. The student is expected to:
      WH.24A  describe the changing roles of women, children, and families during major eras of world history;
      WH.24B  describe the major influences of women such as Elizabeth I, Queen Victoria, Mother Teresa, Indira Gandhi, Margaret Thatcher, and Golda Meir during major eras of world history.
WH.25  Culture. The student understands how the development of ideas has influenced institutions and societies. The student is expected to:
      WH.25D  explain how Islam influences law and government in the Muslim world.
WH.26  Culture. The student understands the relationship between the arts and the times during which they were created. The student is expected to:
      WH.26A  identify significant examples of art and architecture that demonstrate an artistic ideal or visual principle from selected cultures;
      WH.26B  analyze examples of how art, architecture, literature, music, and drama reflect the history of the cultures in which they are produced;
      WH.26C  identify examples of art, music, and literature that transcend the cultures in which they were created and convey universal themes.
WH.28  Science, technology, and society. The student understands how major scientific and mathematical discoveries and technological innovations have affected societies from
    1750 to the present. The student is expected to:
      WH.28D  explain the role of telecommunication technology, computer technology, transportation technology, and medical advancements in developing the modern global economy and society;
      WH.28E  identify the contributions of significant scientists and inventors such as Marie Curie, Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein, Louis Pasteur, and James Watt.
Unit #14 TEST
Review & Prepare for Unit #14 TEST
These three days will
be used to review the
information and
skills presented in
this unit and
measure the
objectives learned.
Semester TEST
Oil, OPEC, and the Middle East
Asia Rising
Globalization and New Technologies
Israel and the Middle East
Global Issues
Last Day to Turn in Missing Work
End of Semester
Understanding & Correcting Test Mistakes
Study Guide
Last Day of School - Early Release
Read Ch. 30-2
Reading Review
Read Ch. 32-1
Reading Review
Read Ch. 31-3
Reading Review
Read Ch. 29-2/3
Reading Review
China: The People's Economy
Making Connections
Video Qs
Global Issues
OPEC Chart
Conflict Map/Timeline
Israel and the
Middle East
Globalization
Oil
Global Issues
In Unit #14 the class will examine recent world history.  Students will investigate the
Middle East and study the conflict between Israel and the Arab countries.  They will
analyze the importance of oil in todays world.  The class will learn about the rise of the
new China and examine potential growth in India.  Students will learn about the
interconnectedness of our global society and investigate current world issues such as
climate change, poverty, hunger, and disease.  They will also examine the role of
technology in our world, now and in the future.
Homework, Enrichment, and Alternate Assignments
Modern China
World Energy
Modern Japan
Modern India
European Union
Change in China
Terrorism
Snapshot: The World We Live In
The Modern World
Turn in Books, Check Out, Wrap Up,
Graduation
PowerPoint
Mapskills
DBQ
Writing
Video
Test
Class/Group
Activity
Graphic
Organizer
Reading
Primary
Sources
Research
Notes
Review
Quiz
Read: Chapter 35-3
Global Economy
Read: Chapter 34-2
Western Europe & N. America
Read: Chapter 34-4
Regions After WWII
Read: Chapter 35-1/2
Social/Political Challenges
Read: Chapter 35-4
Science/Technology
Read: Chapter 34-3
China, Japan, Korea
Read: Chapter 32-2
The Middle East
TRS